North Pumicestone Passage paddle (Queensland, Australia)

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It’s been ages since Mum and I went paddling together. And I’ve never paddled at the northern end of Bribie Island. A friend of mine recently shared some photos of a paddle in the area and it inspired me so I invite Mum along for a day on the water. We launch at Golden Beach, Caloundra. Fortunately, a local warns us about the need to paddle a hundred meters north into the boating channel rather than having to walk a long way across sand banks on the more direct route to the island.

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Right from the word go I am struck by the clear water. It’s stinking hot (35’C) and humid. The clear water almost feels cool just looking at it.

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After entering the boating channel we turn south and drift / paddle with the tide and wind pushing us along. I am a little surprised at how quickly we are pushed along. It’s like being on a water slide without the crazy bends.

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Black lumps rise form the water. At first I cannot identify what the lumps are. But on closer inspection it turns out to be a huge flock of black swans with bright red beaks. I don’t have a reliable zoom lens on my phone camera so have to make do with a quick shot before the swans fly a short distance away from the boats.

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We drift and paddle for about an hour along the Pumicestone Passage. I had intended to travel towards Bells Creek but it’s so hot and Mum hasn’t paddled in ages. So, instead, I stop when I see a small patch of sand between the mangroves. We have to wade knee-deep through thick mud to get to shore but it’s worth it because it’s dry on the sand on a narrow ledge between two mangrove forests. I hang two hammocks, lay out a picnic blanket and we pull out some books. We chill in the wilderness for almost three hours. It’s a random place to rest so it’s kind of special.

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On setting off we thought the tide should have changed. Certainly the tide chart I used said it should have but it was still dead tide with a head wind. The paddling is still relatively easy though. Particularly because I’m enjoying time with Mum in nature.

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We stop at the Lions Park on Bribie Island to walk to the ocean side. It’s only a few minutes walk across the island here. All the while we can listen to the sound of waves crashing on ocean beach. Over on the beach we lay in shallow water for a swim. It’s great to finally cool off properly from the heat. And the clear water just demands entry.

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Leaving Lions Park we paddle across the Passage back towards Golden Beach. The water is so incredibly clear over the sand banks now that the tide has come in.

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Kite surfers zip across the water. And one of their dogs swims happily in the shallows. This is incredible!

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We beach the kayaks, take a swim, load the kayaks on the car and jump back into the water. It’s been a wonderful day.

Pumicestone Passage Paddle (Queensland, Australia)

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It’s amazing what knowing I am finishing up at my stressful job has done to my head space. Suddenly I am not spending my weekends stressing about family law matters and client needs. I am not feeling pressure to work because I need to make billables and I’m not feeling like there’s a lifetime of the limited four weeks annual leave that would otherwise await me. And this freedom made it easy for me to throw the kayaks on the roof of the car, message a friend and hit the water for a day of paddling.
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The Pumicestone Passage at Bribie Island is an amazing place of clear water, white sandy beaches, mangroves, sea creatures and a backdrop of the Glasshouse Mountains. F and I set off around 8am from a beach just north of the Bribie Island Bridge. The incoming tide created a perfect opportunity to drift and paddle northwards up the passage (you don’t want to paddle here against the tide).
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The water was incredibly clear today. Winter and spring are the best time of year to paddle here in South East Queensland because the summer storms are long gone and blue sky days allow the water to reflect blue. We did a lot of chatting as we drifted and paddled gently up and down the passage. I know I’m feeling content again because I didn’t feel an urge to push myself. I felt content to relax and feel the sun on my body, dip my hands in the cool water, share stories with F and admire the Glasshouse Mountains in the distance.
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We stopped on a beach just north of Gallagher Point. A child from a nearby boat played in the water. A stingray swam along the sandy sea bottom. Water lapped gently against the shore every time a boat or jet ski passed by. Donnybrook perched on the shoreline across the passage; the houses glistening white in the bright sunshine. I must come back and camp up here overnight to have more time to take in the atmosphere.
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On our way back down the passage we passed a dugong eating sea grass close to shore. It was majestic and right next to our boats. Suddenly it was just there and we had to move out of its way. Quite a spectacular moment. We also saw turtles and stingrays.

On returning to the cars we loaded the kayaks then F left for home. I hung out in the shade of some trees eating a late lunch then went for a little swim in the passage. I can’t wait for the next adventure …